Thursday, December 13, 2012

M. E. XXX

Chione (1) Daughter of Boreas and Orithyia, mother of Eumolpus by Poseidon ( See EUMOLPUS ). (2) Daughter of Daedalion, mother of Philammon by Apollo, and of Autolycus by Hermes. She was slain by Artemis for venturing to compare her own beauty with that of the goddess.

Polydectes The son of Magnes, king of the island of Seriphus. He attempted to compel Danaë to marry him, but was turned to stone by her son Perseus by the sight of the head of Medusa. See PERSEUS.

Perses Class. Myth. a son of Perseus and Andromeda and the ancestor of the kings of Persia. 2. brother of King Aeëtes of Colchis. Having murdered Aeëtes and seized the throne, Perses was killed by his niece Medea and her son Medus.

Carpophorus Class. Myth. an epithet of both Demeter and her daughter, Persephone, meaning " fruit-bearer."

Cephissus The divinity of the river Cephissus, is described as a son of Pontus and Thalassa, and the father of Diogenia and Narcissus, who therefore is called Cephisius. ( Hygin. Fab. Praef.; Apollod. iii. 5 & 1; Ov. Met. iii. 343, &c.) He had an altar in common with Pan, the Nymphs, and Achelous, in the temple of Amphiaraus near Oropus. ( Paus. i. 34. 2.).

Laurina The daughter of Latinus and wife of Locrus. [ See LATINUS.]

Phaeax A son of Poseidon and Cercyra, from whom the Phaeacians derived their name. ( Diod. iv. 72; Steph. Byz. s. v. Phaiax.) Conon ( Narrat. 3 ) calls him the father of Alcinous and Locrus.

Ascra The mother of Oeoclus by Poseidon. [See OEOCLUS.]

Mezentius [L.] Roman Myth. A cruel Etruscan king who aided Turnus against Aeneas. He bound living persons face to face with dead ones, leaving them to starve. ─ Mezentian, adj.  Mezentism, n.

Altis [Gr.] Gr. Antiq. The sacred enclosure or grove at Olympia, near which the Olympic games were held.

Ovillus [NL., fr. L. ovillus of sheep;  in ref. to the sheep of the Hesperides, by confusion of Gr. mēlon sheep with mēlon apple.] Astron. Hercules;  occasional name.

Tarpeia Class. Myth. a vestal virgin who betrayed Rome to the Sabines and was crushed under their shields when she claimed a reward.

Delphicus A surname of Apollo, from his sanctuary and worship at Delphi ( q. v.).

Clymeneides A patronymic name given to Phaëthon's sisters, who were the daughters of Clymené.

Heraeum The name given to any temple of Heré, that of Argos being the most famous.

Cheloné A nymph who was the only one of the deities that did not attend the nuptials of Zeus and Heré, and who even made the celebration a subject of ridicule. Hermes thereupon precipated her into a river, on the banks of which her mansion was situated, and transformed her into a tortoise, under which shape she was doomed to perpetual silence, and to the necessity of always carrying her dwelling about with her. The Greek for a tortoise is χελώνη, and hence the fable arose.

Aloeus Class. Myth. a son of Poseidon, husband of Iphimedia, and foster father of Otus and Ephialtes. Cf. Aloadae.

Liber an ancient Italian god of wine and vineyards, in later times identified with Bacchus.

Amata Rom. Legend. the mother, by Latinus, of Lavinia.

Dactyl Class. Myth. any of a number of beings dwelling on Mount Ida and working as metalworkers and magicians. Also, Daktyl.  [ < Gk. Dáktyloi ( Idaîoi ) ( Idaean ) craftsmen or wizards ( pl. of dáktylos; see DACTYL )]

Chloris [L., fr. Gr. Chlōris.] 1. Gr. Myth. a The goddess of flowers and wife of Zephyrus;  identified with the Roman Flora. b A daughter of Amphion and Niobé, who with one brother escaped the destruction visited by Apollo and Artemis upon Niobe's children.

protogod A primary or primitive god from whose attributes other gods are developed.

King of Men a In Homer's Iliad, Agamemnon, King of Mycenae. b Class. Myth. Zeus, or Jupiter. c Odin.

Galene A personification of the calm sea, and perhaps identical with Galatea, one of the Nereides, is called by Hesiod (Theog. 244) a daughter of Nereus and Doris.

Laelaps That is, the storm-wind, which is personified in the legend of the dog of Procris which bore this name. Procris had received this extremely swift animal as a present, either from Artemis or Minos, and afterwords left it to her husband Cephalus. When the Teumessian fox was sent as a punishment to the Thebans, to which they had to sacrifice a boy every month, and when Creon had requested Amphitryon to deliver the city of the monster fox, Cephalus sent out the dog Laelaps against the fox. The dog overtook the fox, but Zeus changed both animals into a stone, which was shown in the neighbourhood of Thebes. (Apollod. ii. 4. § 6; Hygin. Fab. 189, Poet. Astr. ii. 35; Ov. Met. vii. 771.)

Hecamede A maiden of Tenedos, and daughter of Arsinous. When Achilles took the island, Hecamede was given to Nestor as a slave. ( Hom. Il. xi. 622, xiv.6.)

Euthymus A hero of Locri in Italy, was a son of Astycles or of the river-god Caecinus. He was famous for his strength and skill in boxing, and delivered the town of Temessa from the evil spirit Polites, to whom a fair maiden was sacrificed every year. Euthymus himself disappeared at an advanced age in the river Caecinus. (Strab. vi. p. 255; Aelian, V.H. viii. 18; Eustath. ad Hom. p. 1409.) He gained several victories at Olympia ( Ol. 74, 76, and 77); and a statue of his at Olympia was the work of Pythagoras. (Paus. vi. 6. § 2, 10. § 2.)

Rhetia The mother of the Samothracian Corybantes by Apollo. [See CABEIRI.]

Asteria A daughter of the Titan Coeus and the Titanid Phoebé, sister of Leto, and mother of Hecaté by Perses, son of the Titan Crius. She is said to have been turned into a quail and plunged into the sea to escape the advances of Zeus. After her the island of Delos ( q.v.) was first called Asteria, and later Ortygia.

Eleutho A surname of Ilithyia, from her coming ( ελθείν ), when invoked to the aid of women in labour ( Pind. Ol. vi. 72 ).

Bromian adj. [L. Bromius, fr. Gr. Bromios.] Of or pertaining to Bromios, or Dionysus ( which see ). n. Bromian drink; wine.

Larunda or Lara Daughter of Almon, the nymph who informed Iuno of the connection between Iupiter and Iuturna: hence her name was connected with λαλείν. Iupiter deprived her of her tongue, and ordered Mercury to conduct her to the lower world. One the way thither Mercury fell in love with her and she afterwords gave birth to two Lares ( Ovid, Fasti, ii. 599 foll.; Macrob. 1. 7, 34 ). See LARES.

Ephialtes [L., fr. Gr. Ephialtēs.] 1. Gr. Myth. One of the Aloadae ( which see ).

Rhoecus (1) A Centaur, who, in conjunction with Hylaeus, pursued Atalanta in Arcadia, but was killed by her with an arrow.

Priamedes A patronymic applied to Paris, as being a son of Priam. It is also given to Hector, Deïphobus, and all the other children of the Trojan king ( Verg. Aen. iii. 295 foll.).

Enarephorus Son of Hippocoön. He was a passionate admirer of Helen when she was still very young, so that Tyndareus intrusted her to the care of Theseus. See HELENA.

Apharidae [L., fr. Gr. Apharidai.] Gr. Myth. Sons of Aphareus. See IDAS.

Rhodope [NL., fr. Gr. Rhodopē, name of a nymph.]

Saggitary [See SAGGITARIUS.] 3. Myth. A monster fabled in medieval Troy romances to have fought in the Trojan army; also [ not cap.], a centaur.

Cydippida [NL., fr. L. Cydippe, fr. Gr. Kydippē, name of a Nereid.]

a-1898 Harper's Dict. of Class. Literature & Antiquities

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