Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Roman Mythology

Jupiter In Roman mythology, the god ruling over all other gods and all men: identified with the Greek Zeus.  n. The largest planet of the solar system, fifth in order from the sun. See PLANET.

Juno In Roman mythology, the wife of Jupiter, queen of the gods and goddess of marriage: identified with the Greek Hera.  n. A woman of queenly beauty.

Minerva In Roman mythology, the goddess of wisdom, invention, and handicraft: identified with the Greek Athena.

Neptune In Roman mythology, the god of the sea: identified with the Greek Poseidon.  n. The fourth largest planet of the solar system and eighth in order from the sun. See PLANET.  [< L Neptunus ]

Pluto In Greek and Roman mythology, the god of the dead: identified with the Greek Hades and the Roman Dis.  n. A planet of the solar system, having an undetermined size and ninth in order from the sun. See PLANET.

Ceres In Roman mythology, the goddess of grain and harvests: identified with the Greek Demeter.  n. The first of the asteroids to be discovered, 1801.

Diana In Roman mythology, goddess of the hunt, virginity, and the moon: identified with the Greek Artemis.  n. The moon.

Apollo In Greek and Roman mythology, the god of music, poetry, prophecy, and medicine:later identified with Helios.  n. Any handsome young man.

Mercury In Roman mythology, the herald and messenger of the gods, god of commerce, eloquence, and skill, and patron of travelers, merchants, and thieves: identified with the Greek Hermes.  n. The smallest planet of the solar system, and that nearest the sun. See PLANET.

Vulcan In Roman mythology, the god of fire and of metallurgy: identified with the Greek Hephaestus.

Venus In Roman mythology, the goddess of love, spring, bloom, and  beauty: identified with the Greek Aphrodite.  n. 1. The sixth largest planet of the solar system and second in order from the sun. See PLANET. 2. A statue or painting of Venus. 3. A lovely woman. 4. Obs. In alchemy, copper. [< L]

Mars In Roman mythology, the god of war: identified with the Greek Ares.  n. 1. The seventh largest planet of the solar system and forth in order from the sun. 2. Obs. Iron.

Vesta 1. In Roman mythology, the goddess of the hearth and of the hearth fire, protectress of the state, and custodian of the sacred fire tended by the vestals: identified with the Greek Hestia. 2. Astron. A large asteroid.

Aurora In Roman mythology, the goddess of the dawn: identified with the Greek Eos.

Aesculapius In Roman mythology, the god of medicine: identified with the Greek Asclepius.

Juventas [L.] Rom. Relig. Youth personified as a goddess, identified with the Greek Hebe.

Sol 1. The sun. 2. In Roman mythology, the god of the sun.  [ < L ]

Salus In Roman mythology, goddess of health and prosperity.  [< L, salūs health ]

Faunus In Roman mythology, a god of nature, patron of agriculture: identified with the Greek Pan.

Luna In Roman mythology, goddess of the moon: identified with the Greek Selene.  [< L ]

Discordia Rom. Myth. The goddess of strife.  [ Lat. < discordia, discord. See DISCORD. ]

Morpheus Roman mythology the son of Somnus ( god of sleep ) the god of dreams and, in later writings, also god of sleep.

Moneta In Roman mythology, the goddess of memory, and by Jupiter, mother of the Muses.

Nefas The Roman personification of wickedness.

Bacchus In classical mythology, the god of wine and revelry: identified with Dionysus.

Trivia ( in Roman religion ) Hecate: so called because she was the goddess of the crossroads.  [ < L, fem. of trivius ( adj.), deriv. of trivinium place where three roads meet, equiv. to tri- TRI- + vinium, deriv. of trivinium place ]

Cupid In Roman mythology, the god of love: identified with the Greek Eros. n. 1. A representation of the god of love as a naked, winged boy with a bow and arrow. 2. One who arranges or helps to arrange meetings between lovers: chiefly in the phrase to play Cupid.  [ < L Cupidcupido passion, desire ]

Caelus  [L.] Roman Relig. The defied sky, associated with the cult of Mithras, equivalent to the Semitic Baal of the heavens, and connected with the Persian Ahura-Mazda.
Ogen In Roman mythology, a Titan, early god of the sea and father of the Oceanids.

Favonius In Roman mythology, the west wind personified.

Halius In Roman mythology, a sea-god and father of the Haliades.

Mors In Roman mythology, death personified as a god: identified with the Greek Thanatos.  [ < L, death ]

Hours In Roman mythology, the three goddesses of the seasons, and of orderliness.

Proteus In Roman mythology, a sea-god who had the power of assuming different forms.

Aquilo the ancient Roman personification of the north wind. Cf. Boreas.

Proserpine In Roman mythology, the daughter of Ceres and wife of Pluto: identified with the Greek Persephone. Also Proserpina.

Victoria In Roman mythology, the winged goddess of victory: identified with the Greek Nike.

Somnus In Roman mythology, the god of sleep: identified with the Greek Hypnos.

Volturnus the ancient Roman personification of the east or southeast wind.Cf. Eurus.

Auster called Notus by the Greeks. The south wind, or ,strictly, the southwest wind. It frequently brought with it fogs and rain; but at certain seasons of the year it was a dry, sultry wind, injurious both to man and to vegetation, the sirocco of the modern Italians. The name auster is from the root found in the Latin uro, " to burn."

Bellona In Roman mythology, the goddess of war, sister or wife of Mars.

Acmon The personification of the clear upper air breathed by the Olympians.

 a-1964 Standard College Dictionary

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